The modelling of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere based upon ATM data
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The modelling of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere based upon ATM data final technical report

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Published by Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Honolulu, Hawaii, Marshall Space Flight Center, Ala .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Skylab Program.,
  • Solar photosphere.,
  • Solar chromosphere.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames N. Heasley, Principal Investigator ; prepared for George C. Marshall Flight Center.
SeriesNASA-CR -- 170920., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-170920.
ContributionsGeorge C. Marshall Space Flight Center.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16118906M

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Modelling of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere based upon ATM data (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: James N Heasley; George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The modelling of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere based upon ATM data. By J. N. Heasley. Get PDF ( KB) Abstract. Spectral data obtained by the SO82B experiment aboard SKYLAB were used to critically evaluate existing models of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere. Spectral data obtained by the SO82B Author: J. N. Heasley. The modelling of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere based upon ATM data Spectral data obtained by the SO82B experiment aboard SKYLAB were used to critically evaluate existing models of the solar upper photosphere and lower chromosphere. These spectral diagnostics were used to develop new solar models. The temperature of the chromosphere varies substantially with height above the photosphere. At first, the temperature decreases with height - from roughly 6,° C (11,° F) at the photosphere to about 4,° C (7,° F) a couple hundred kilometers higher up.

The chromosphere may play a role in conducting heat from the interior of the sun to its outermost layer, the corona. "We see certain kinds of solar seismic waves channeling upwards into the lower. The solar chromosphere is traditionally defined as the layer, lying between the pho-tosphere and the transition region, where the temperature first starts to rise outwards. The lower boundary in this definition is formed by the temperature minimum layer. The upper boundary is less clearly marked, however, with a temperature around 1−2× K.   The source of this "differential rotation" is an area of current research in solar astronomy. A Mb MPEG movie showing magnetic features in the photosphere over a 36 day period is available here. These data were obtained with the GONG solar telescope network. The movie illustrates the rotation of the Sun as well as the evolution of the Sun's. The dynamic interface region (IR) spans the photosphere and lower corona. Typical mass and energy density in the IR are orders of magnitude larger than in the corona as a whole (McWhirter et al.

The bright white area seen on the right side of the Sun in this image from the Solar Dynamics Observer spacecraft is a solar flare that was observed on J (credit: NASA/SDO) Flares, like the one shown in [link], are often observed in the red light of hydrogen, but the visible emission is only a tiny fraction of the energy released.   The chromosphere (from the Greek word χ ρωμoσ, color) is the lowest part of the solar atmosphere, extending to an average height of ∼ km above the photosphere. The first theoretical concepts conceived the chromosphere as a spherical layer around the solar surface (in the s; Fig. 6, left), while later refinements included the diverging magnetic fields (canopies) with height (in. In this work we use millimeter wave data to distinguish between various atmospheric models of sunspots, whose temperature structure in the upper photosphere and chromosphere has been the .   The chromosphere is also visible in the light emitted by ionized calcium, Ca II, in the violet part of the solar spectrum at a wavelength of nanometers (the Calcium K-line). This emission is seen in other solar-type stars where it provides important information about the chromospheres and activity cycles in those stars.